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Testicular Cancer Treatment in Singapore

Hospitals and medical centers in Singapore which treat Testicular Cancer patients.

Raffles Hospital

A full service private hospital offering a comprehensive range of specialist services by a team of 200 physicians. 35-40% of the patients are foreigners, and there is a dedicated department for handling medical tourists.

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Testicular Cancer is treated at Raffles Hospital

3 listed oncologists:

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Dr. Lynette Ngo Su Mien

Breast and gynaecologic cancers, psychosocial oncology and palliative medicine

Dr. Donald Poon Yew Hee

Medical Oncology

Gleneagles Hospital

A 380 bed private hospital offering tertiary acute care services that cover a wide range of medical and surgical specialties.

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Testicular Cancer is treated at Gleneagles Hospital

12 listed oncologists:

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Assoc. Prof. Tay Sun Kuie

Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Surgical Oncology

Dr. Ang Cher Siang Peter

Medical Oncology

Mount Elizabeth Hospital

One of the largest private medical centers in Asia, with the highest number of private specialists including cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and neurologists, neurosurgeons and general surgeons.

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Testicular Cancer is treated at Mount Elizabeth Hospital

29 listed oncologists:

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Dr. Preetha Madhukumar

General Surgery, Surgical Oncology

Dr. Yong Wei Sean

Surgical Oncology

National Cancer Centre

A comprehensive cancer centre providing a full range of clinical services to its patients.

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Testicular Cancer is treated at National Cancer Centre

75 listed oncologists:

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Dr. Koong Heng Nung

Head, Department of Surgical Oncology

Dr. Alethea Yee

Head of the Department of Palliative Medicine

National University Hospital

A 928 bed teaching hospital offering a full range of medical, surgical and diagnostic services. NUH serves as a refferal center for cancer patients, pediatrics, cardiology and other specialties.

Availability:

Testicular Cancer is treated at National University Hospital

60 listed oncologists:

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Dr. Frances Lim

Director, General Surgery Residency Program

Prof. Kesavan Esuvaranathan

Head & Senior Consultant

Oncology centers in Singapore (Page 1 of 1)

About Testicular Cancer Treatment

This information is intended for general information only and should not be considered as medical advice on the part of Health-Tourism.com. Any decision on medical treatments, after-care or recovery should be done solely upon proper consultation and advice of a qualified physician.


What is testicular cancer?

This is cancer that affects the testicles. It is a rare form of cancer and usually affects younger men below the age of 50. Testicles are two oval-shaped male sex organs. They sit in the scrotum on either side of the penis. The testicles are part of the male reproductive system and are enclosed in the scrotum- the sac of skin which hangs under the penis. Testicles produce sperms and testosterone which is a major hormone in male sexual development.


What are the symptoms?<
  • A painless lump or swelling in the testicles.
  • A sharp pain or a dull ache in the scrotum or the lower abdomen.
  • Breast enlargement from hormonal effects.
  • Back pain.
  • Shortness of breath, cough or coughing up blood from metastatic spread to the lungs.
  • A lump in the neck due to metastases to the lymph nodes.
  • A dull ache in the scrotum.

Types of testicular cancer

The different types of testicular cancer are classified by the type of cells cancer first begins in. These include:

  • Germ-cell testicular cancer
  • Leydig cell tumors
  • Sertoli cell tumors
  • Lymphoma

Germ-cell testicular cancer is the most common type of testicular cancer. The body uses germ cells to help create sperm. There are two main subtypes of germ cell testicular cancer; non-seminomas and seminomas.


Risk factors for testicular cancer

The cause or causes of testicular cancer are unknown, but several things have been pointed out, which increase the chance of developing the condition. These include:

  • Having a family history of testicular cancer
  • Having had abnormal testicle development
  • Being born with undescended testicles

Diagnosis

Your doctor will perform a physical exam to look for the signs of cancer of the testicles. Laboratory tests and imaging tests are used to confirm the diagnosis. Biopsy should not be done because it increases the risk of spreading cancer to the scrotum. Accurate diagnosis is crucial to ensure that treatment is effective and appropriate.


Treatment

Most cases of cancer of the testicles can be treated if diagnosed early. Treatments include surgery, whereby the affected testicle is removed. The procedure done to remove the affected testicle is known as an orchiectomy. Although it is possible to remove tumors from a testis while leaving it functional, it is rarely done because the precancerous cells can spread through the entire testicle. Other treatments used for cancer of the testicles are chemotherapy and radiation therapy.


Conclusion

If the treatment option chosen has infertility as a side effect, you can bank your sperm at a sperm bank for later on when you want to have children. Surgical removal of the affected testicle does not cause infertility or the ability to have sex. After treatment, it is crucial to have regular exams to ensure the cancer is all gone.

Learn more about Testicular Cancer

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