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Melanoma Treatments in Europe

Hospitals and medical centers in Europe which treat Melanoma patients.

Grupo Hospitalario Quirón

Quirón has an internationally prestigious medical staff, the largest in the sector, and is also the principal hospital network in terms of patient numbers and care facility area. The group administers 38 healthcare centers, more than 2,864 hospital beds and 7,500 associate doctors.


Melanoma is treated at Grupo Hospitalario Quirón

Hygeia Hospital

Hygeia Hospital's continuously updated Dermatology Department is equipped with state-of-the-art technology. Staffed with qualified medical personnel, it covers the entire range of skin conditions.


Melanoma is treated at Hygeia Hospital Athens

Hospital Ruber Internacional

The Dermatology service of Hospital Ruber Internacional, is a leading provider of specialist healthcare and advice on skin conditions for both adults and children in Madrid Spain.


Melanoma is treated at Hospital Ruber Internacional

HM Hospitales

HM Hospitales is a hospital group with six private hospitals in Madrid: three general hospitals, a cardiovascular hospital, an oncological center and a women's health hospital.


Melanoma is treated at HM Hospitales

Vithas Xanit International Hospital

The medical-surgical dermatology and STD department at Vithas Xanit International Hospital runs diagnosis and medical-surgical treatment on all cutaneous-mucous pathologies and sexually transmitted diseases as well as normal skin maintenance using the latest dermo-cosmetic treatment.


Melanoma is treated at Vithas Xanit International Hospital

Anadolu Medical Center

Anadolu Medical Center is one of the most modern, comprehensive and respected hospitals in Turkey. Anadolu is affiliated with John Hopkins Hospital.


Melanoma is treated at Anadolu

Listed dermatologists:

Dr. Mehmet Coşkun Acay MD

Dermatoscopic analysis of nevus

Dr. Figen Akın MD

Dermatoscopic analysis of nevus
Botox Treatment of Hyperhidrosis

Hospital Universitario HM Sanchinarro

Dermatology is a medical-surgical specialty that deals with the knowledge of human skin, mucous membranes, skin adnexa and diseases that primitively or secondarily affect it, as well as methods for the prevention of them and for the preservation or the recovery of cutaneous normality.


Melanoma is treated at Hospital Universitario HM Sanchinarro

Hospital Universitario HM Montepríncipe

The Department of Dermatology examines the entire body for dermatological diseases. Providing diagnoses and treatments for common dermatological diseases, bullous dermatoses, connective tissue diseases, skin cancers, and congenital skin diseases in cooperation with other departments.


Melanoma is treated at Hospital Universitario HM Montepríncipe

Klinikum Stuttgart

One of Germany's largest hospitals, made up of more than 50 clinics and specialist institutes spanning all medical specialties. Kinikum Stuttgart is regarded as one of the best hospitals in Germany, and is a referral center for oncology, ENT, pediatrics and more.


Melanoma is treated at Klinikum Stuttgart

8 listed dermatologists:

view all >

Dr. M.-c. Thode

Surgical Dermatology, Dermatology Classic

Dr. J. Rieker-Schwienbacher

Allergy, Atopic Dermatitis, Occupational Diseases, Contact Dermatitis, Fever, Asthma

Hospital Clínic Costa Brava

Hospital Clínic Costa Brava is a modern medical facility with over 250 medical specialists, offering medical, surgical, aesthetic, cosmetic and rehabilitation treatments in the relaxing tourism town of Palamos, Costa Brava.


Melanoma is treated at Hospital Clínic Costa Brava

Dermatology centers in Europe (Page 1 of 2)

About Melanoma Treatment

This information is intended for general information only and should not be considered as medical advice on the part of Any decision on medical treatments, after-care or recovery should be done solely upon proper consultation and advice of a qualified physician.

What is melanoma?

This is a type of cancer that originates from the pigment-producing cells known as melanocytes located in the basal layer of the epidermis. Melanomas usually occur in the skin but in rare cases they may occur in the mouth, eyes and intestines. Melanomas may also develop from a mole. Most melanomas are brown or black although some are pink, skin-colored, red, blue, purple or white.

What causes melanoma?

Ultraviolet light (UV) exposure is the most common cause of melanoma. People with low levels of skin pigment are at high risk of developing melanoma when exposed to ultraviolet light from the sun or tanning devices. The genetic defect can also cause the skin cells to rapidly multiply forming malignant tumors.

Risk factors include:
  • Lots of freckles or moles
  • Red or blonde hair
  • A family history of melanoma
  • Pale skin that easily burns

Types of melanoma
  • Superficial spreading melanoma: This is the most common type of melanoma.
  • Nodular melanoma: This fast developing melanoma is common in middle-aged people. It can appear in areas not regularly exposed to the sun.
  • Lentigo maligna melanoma: It is most common in the elderly and people who spend most of their time outdoors. It mostly develops on the face and slowly over several years.
  • Acral lentiginous melanoma: This is a rare melanoma that appears on the soles of feet and on the palms of the hands. It is common in people with dark skin.

  • If you notice any changes in your moles you should see a specialist.
  • A biopsy of the suspicious mole will be removed surgically and studied for cancer cells.
  • A sentinel node biopsy may also be done to check if the melanoma has spread to other body parts.

  • The typical treatment of melanoma is removal by surgery. This is usually the case if it is diagnosed early.
  • If the diagnosis is late and the melanoma has spread, chemotherapy is usually used to slow cancer and manage symptoms.
  • Other treatments include biologic therapy, immunotherapy, or radiation therapy.

How can I prevent melanoma?
  • Avoid exposure to ultraviolet light and if exposure is unavoidable use sunscreen.
  • Check your freckles and moles regularly for any changes.

How to check for melanoma
    Knowing your skin is an important part of diagnosing melanoma especially by recognizing any changes in the moles or freckles on your body. You should look for the ABCDE signs of melanoma and if there are one or more, you should see your doctor.
  • Asymmetry: If you draw a line through the middle and the two sides are not the same it is asymmetrical and this is a warning sign.
  • Border: The borders of melanoma are uneven and the edges may be notched and scalloped.
  • Color: Melanomas have a variety of colors and different shades of black, brown or tan may appear. The melanoma may also become white, blue or red.
  • Diameter: Melanomas usually have a large diameter. However, they may be smaller when first detected.
  • Evolving: Melanomas change or evolve over time. Any changes in shape, size or color should be a warning sign. Any new symptoms such as itching, crusting or bleeding should be of concern.

Learn more about Melanoma

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