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Retinoblastoma Treatments Abroad

Details of international hospitals and medical centers which treat Retinoblastoma patients.

Medipol Mega University Hospital

Medipol Mega Hospital Complex is a modern medical facility with four specialist hospitals and an extensive selection of high caliber medical devices available for use. The hospital provides treatments in a wide variety of medical fields in its 470 bed facility.

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Medipol Mega University Hospital

9 listed ophthalmologists:

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Instituto de Microcirugía Ocular (IMO Barcelona)

The Instituto de Microcirugía Ocular (IMO – Institute of Ocular Microsurgery in English) is a leading international ophthalmology centre. Our hallmark is medical excellence and our objective is to provide the best service to the patient. Borja Corcóstegui, IMO Medical Director

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Instituto de Microcirugía Ocular (IMO Barcelona)

32 listed ophthalmologists:

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Dr. Borja Corcóstegui

Co-founder and medical director of IMO

Dr. Isabel Nieto

complex cataract

HM Hospitales

HM Hospitales is a hospital group with six private hospitals in Madrid: three general hospitals, a cardiovascular hospital, an oncological center and a women's health hospital.

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Retinoblastoma is treated at HM Hospitales

Grupo Hospitalario Quirón

Chiron Hospital Group, a specialist in high complexity medicine and pioneered the introduction of new technologies in all fields of medicine, offers Ophthalmology Units formed by professionals of great prestige.

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Grupo Hospitalario Quirón

Hospital Clínic Costa Brava

Hospital Clínic Costa Brava is a modern medical facility with over 250 medical specialists, offering medical, surgical, aesthetic, cosmetic and rehabilitation treatments in the relaxing tourism town of Palamos, Costa Brava.

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Hospital Clínic Costa Brava

Koc University Hospital

Koc University Hospital’s Health Sciences Campus spans over an area of 220.000 m2 and serves with 404 Rooms, 73 Intensive Care Units, 12 Operating Rooms and 14 Intervention Rooms to provide healthcare services with its innovative approach and dynamic team at North American standards.

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Koc University

3 listed ophthalmologists:

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Prof. Orkun Müftüoğlu MD

Professor of Ophthalmology

Prof. Sumru Onal MD

Professor of Ophthalmology: Eye Diseases

Klinik Hirslanden & Klinik Im Park

An ophthalmologist specialises in eyes. He knows about the various structures and functions in and around the eye. He treats all kinds of injuries and disorders of the eye, eyelid and eye muscles. Cataracts (a lens disorder), glaucoma (pressure in the eye) and strabismus (squint) are among the best-

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Hirslanden

Medicana Healthcare Group

An ophthalmologist is a medical doctor (MD) or a doctor of osteopathic medicine (DO) who specializes in eye and vision care. Ophthalmologists are trained to perform eye exams, diagnose and treat disease, prescribe medications and perform eye surgery.

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Medicana Healthcare Group

Listed ophthalmologists:

Prof. Murat Levent Alimgil

Chief of Ophthalmology Department

Bangkok Hospital Pattaya

This multi-specialty tertiary hospital offers various medical services as well as dental procedures to local and overseas patients. It serves over 100,000 international patients every year.

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Bangkok Hospital Pattaya

20 listed ophthalmologists:

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Hospital Ruber Internacional

The Ruber International Hospital is designed as a "whole hospital". thus achieving maximum efficiency in the organization and development of the various medical, welfare, educational and research activities.

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Retinoblastoma is treated at Hospital Ruber Internacional

Ophthalmology centers abroad (Page 1 of 3)

About Retinoblastoma Treatment

This information is intended for general information only and should not be considered as medical advice on the part of Health-Tourism.com. Any decision on medical treatments, after-care or recovery should be done solely upon proper consultation and advice of a qualified physician.


What Is Retinoblastoma?

Retinoblastoma is a cancerous tumor of the retina, the thin slim nerve tissue, which lines the back of the eye that forms images and senses light. It might be matched against the film in a camera, which identifies images and sends them to the brain for interpretation. Retinoblastoma is often limited to the eye; however, if untreated, can result in metastasis or spreading to other body parts.


Stages of Retinoblastoma

To schedule treatment for retinoblastoma, your child's doctor must know the tumor's precise size and location to establish the stage of illness.

  • Intraocular retinoblastoma - Cancer is discovered in one or in both eyes but doesn’t extend beyond the eye into the tissues around the eye or even to other body parts.
  • Extraocular retinoblastoma - Cancer has spread beyond the eye, often through the optic nerve. It might be limited to the tissues around the eye, or it might have extended to other parts of the body.
  • Trilateral retinoblastoma - In a few patients with bilateral retinoblastoma, a similar tumor grows in the pineal gland at the base of the brain. The existence of these tumors may lead to other neurological symptoms and need neuroimaging of the brain for prognosis.
  • Recurrent retinoblastoma - Recurrent illness signifies that cancer has returned or advanced after it has been treated. It might reappear in the eye or anywhere else in the body.

Symptoms
  • Leukocoria (white pupil or cat's eye reflex).
  • Misaligned eyes (strabismus)
  • Blurred vision

Causes

Retinoblastoma might be nonhereditary or hereditary. The hereditary type might be in one or both eyes. Most retinoblastoma happening in only one eye isn't hereditary; when the illness takes place in both eyes it’s always hereditary. But, while less popular, retinoblastoma might happen in only one eye and might still be hereditary and passed on to kids.

Tests and Diagnosis

Your child's diagnosis and selection of treatment rely on the scope and location of the illness within and outside of the eye. As soon as retinoblastoma is discovered, additional exams will be carried out to ascertain the size of the tumor and if it has spread to surrounding tissue or even to other body parts.


Treatment and Drugs
    The treatment plan considers both cures of cancer and preservation of vision or the affected eye, and consists of the following:
  • Enucleation — operation to take out the eye
  • Cryotherapy — making use of extreme cold to destroy cancer cells
  • Photocoagulation — making use of laser light to destroy blood vessels, which feed the tumor or to heat the tumors in order that chemotherapeutic drugs will be more effective.
  • External or internal beam irradiation therapy —making use of high-energy radiation from x-rays and other methods to shrink tumors and destroy cancer cells. Radiation might come from a machine outside the body (external-beam radiation therapy) or might be given by placing radioactive material into or close to the tumor (internal brachytherapy or internal plaque radiation therapy).
  • Chemotherapy —making use of drugs to destroy cancer cells. One type of chemotherapy, known as chemoreduction, is used to shrink the tumors size in order that even if not curative; the reduced tumors will be much more amenable to other treatment modalities. Chemotherapy might be given systemically (through a vein, by mouth, or with injections). In kids with retinoblastoma, chemotherapy drugs can also be injected:
    • Directly into the fluid, which surrounds the spinal cord and brain (intrathecal chemotherapy).
    • Directly into the artery, which feeds the eye (intra-arterial) for local treatment, which has lesser systemic side effects.

Risks : If your little one has retinoblastoma, especially the hereditary kind, there is a greater chance that in later years he or she might develop second cancer. These cancers are often not connected to the eye, and might affect any organ body organ, but especially the skin, bone, or soft tissue.

Learn more about Retinoblastoma

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