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Retinal Detachment Surgery in Singapore

Hospitals, clinics and medical centers in Singapore performing Retinal Detachment Surgery.

Parkway East Hospital

A private general acute care hospital catering to the Eastern side of Singapore and offering a variety of services in a diverse range of specialties.


Retinal Detachment is treated at Parkway East Hospital

Raffles Hospital

A full service private hospital offering a comprehensive range of specialist services by a team of 200 physicians. 35-40% of the patients are foreigners, and there is a dedicated department for handling medical tourists.


Retinal Detachment is treated at Raffles Hospital

3 listed ophthalmologists:

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Dr. Lee Jong Jian

Deputy Medical Director

Dr. Khoo Chong Yew

Ophthalmic medicine and surgery

Mount Elizabeth Hospital

One of the largest private medical centers in Asia, with the highest number of private specialists including cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and neurologists, neurosurgeons and general surgeons.


Retinal Detachment is treated at Mount Elizabeth Hospital

26 listed ophthalmologists:

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Dr. Lim Wee Kiak

Ocular Inflammation, Immunology and Uveitis

Dr. Theng Thiam Siew Julian

Cornea, cataract and refractive surgery

Tan Tock Seng Hospital

Singapore’s second largest acute care general hospital specializing in Rehabilitation Medicine and Communicable Diseases.


Retinal Detachment is treated at Tan Tock Seng Hospital

36 listed ophthalmologists:

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Dr. Yong Khet Yau, Vernon

Deputy Head, Children's Eye Centre & Eye Alignment Centre

Dr. Wong Hon Tym

Head of Department of Ophthalmology

Changi General Hospital

A major hospital in the eastern side of Singapore, with a capacity of 790 beds and facilities to accommodate outpatients likewise.


Retinal Detachment is treated at Changi General Hospital

11 listed ophthalmologists:

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Dr. Jap Hee Eng Aliza

Head and Senior Consultant

Assoc. Prof. Goh Kong Yong

Neuro-ophthalmology, Cataract & General Ophthalmology

National University Hospital

A 928 bed teaching hospital offering a full range of medical, surgical and diagnostic services. NUH serves as a refferal center for cancer patients, pediatrics, cardiology and other specialties.


Retinal Detachment is treated at National University Hospital

19 listed ophthalmologists:

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Prof. Donald Tan

Visiting Consultant

Assoc. Prof. Tan Woon Teck Clement

Head & Senior Consultant for Neuro-Ophthalmology

Singapore National Eye Centre

An ophthalmic care provider for treatments and other clinical services, teaching, research and various international ophthalmic activities.


Retinal Detachment is treated at Singapore National Eye Centre

75 listed ophthalmologists:

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Prof. Wong Tien Yin

Institute Director, Singapore Eye Research Institute

Dr. Chee Soon Phaik

Head, Ocular Inflammation and Immunology Service

Ophthalmology centers in Singapore (Page 1 of 1)

About Retinal Detachment Surgery

This information is intended for general information only and should not be considered as medical advice on the part of Any decision on medical treatments, after-care or recovery should be done solely upon proper consultation and advice of a qualified physician.

What is Retinal Detachment Surgery?
Retinal detachment surgery is carried out to treat a retinal detachment and return it to its normal position.
Surgery is currently the only option for treating retinal detachment.

What are the types of Retinal Detachment Surgery?
The most common Retinal Detachment Surgery procedures are:

  • Pneumatic retinopexy: A laser or cryotherapy procedure seals the retinal hole or tear and a gas bubble is injected into the cavity in the eye to push the retina towards the eye’s outer wall.
  • Scleral buckling: Holes or tears in the retina are sealed with an electric current or frozen with a cryoprobe or laser. A scleral buckle made of synthetic material is then placed on the outer wall of the eye which compresses the eye and pushes the retinal tear towards the outer wall. Often a gas or air bubble is inserted into the cavity to prevent the hole from moving until scarring takes place and holds it in position.
  • Vitrectomy: The surgeon makes small cuts in the eye and removes the fluid in the eye, replacing it with gas to move the retina to a new position. Sometimes the surgeon also inserts a scleral buckle alongside the vitrectomy.

What are the chances of success?
85% of patients will be successfully treated with one operation, while the remaining 15% will requiring 2 or more operations.
How well you see after surgery depends in part on whether the central part of the retina (macula) was affected by the detachment before surgery, and if it was, for how long.

Duration of procedure/surgery : 1-3 hours, depending on the type of surgery performed.

Days admitted : Usually done on an outpatient basis.
Vitrectomy may require an overnight stay.

Anesthesia : Local or general anesthesia

Recovery : - Limit physical activity for up to a week following retinal detachment surgery.
- If the gas bubble procedure is carried out you will need to keep your head facing down or to one side for up to four weeks in order to make sure the gas bubble fixes the retina in place successfully.
- Blurred vision following a retinal detachment surgery often persists for a few months.

Risks : - Discomfort, redness and swelling.
- Double vision.
- Glaucoma.
- Cataracts.
- Drooping eyelid (ptosis).

After care : - Use medicated eye drops and antibiotics after retinal detachment surgery.
- You will not be able to fly or travel to high altitudes for a few weeks following the gas bubble procedure.
- You may need a new glasses prescription if retinal detachment surgery has changed the shape of your eye.

Learn more about Retinal Detachment

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