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Retinal Detachment Surgery in Latin America

Hospitals, clinics and medical centers in Latin America performing Retinal Detachment Surgery.

Hospital Universitario Austral

A tertiary university hospital with over 750 physicians, providing medical services in most medical specialties. Services to foreign patients include interpreters, insurance coordination, and transportation arrangements. Both hospital and doctors have liability insuranc

Availability:

Retinal Detachment is treated at Hospital Universitario Austral

Clínica Anglo Americana

Clínica Anglo Americana is a JCI accredited medical facility established in 1921 and works with many international insurers. The innovative hospital with its bilingual staff keeps up to date with advanced technologies, and provides treatment in many fields.

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Retinal Detachment is treated at Clínica Anglo Americana

Hospital Velmar

A small multi specialty hospital located in the town of Ensanada, Mexico. A staff of 50 physicians provides surgical and medical care in over 20 medical specialties. The doctors can speak English, and the hospital provides services to foreign patients.

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Retinal Detachment is treated at Hospital Velmar

CIMA Hospital

A modern, JCI accredited hospital which provides a full range of diagnostic, emergency, medical and surgical services.

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Retinal Detachment is treated at CIMA Hospital

4 listed ophthalmologists:

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Dr. Manrique Ortiz

Ophthalmology, Retina and Vitreous

Hospital Universitario de San Vicente Fundación

A large tertiary hospital with over 600 beds and over 400 physicians providing medical care in all medical specialties. The international office can assist patients with insurance, accommodation and transportation. Private rooms are available.

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Retinal Detachment is treated at Hospital Universitario San Vicente

San Fernando Hospital

One of Panama’s largest hospitals, offering a wide range of medical specialties and fully equipped facilities. Clinica Hospital San Fernando was the first hospital in Panama to be accredited by the JCI.

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Retinal Detachment is treated at San Fernando Hospital

Centro Medico Puerta de Hierro

Centro Médico Puerta de Hierro (CMPDH) is a private, proudly Mexican organization, specializing in the provision of high quality health services.

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Retinal Detachment is treated at Centro Medico Puerta de Hierro

28 listed ophthalmologists:

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Dr. Ricardo Acosta Gonzalez, MD

Ophthalmology and Refractive Surgeon

Hospital CIMA Monterrey

Hospital CIMA Monterrey is an acute-care hospital that was originally a women's specialty hospital (formerly known as Hospital Santa Engracia) when it opened in 1996. It is located in San Pedro, Garza Garcia, a suburb of Monterrey, in Mexico.

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Retinal Detachment is treated at Hospital CIMA Monterrey

San Angel Hospital

A small, modern, private hospital, located in the border city of Nuevo Laredo, right across the Texas border. 50% of the patients come from the United States, due to the proximity to the Texas border, and to the easy access by car and by air.

Availability:

Retinal Detachment is treated at San Angel Hospital

Hospital Punta Pacifica

A modern private hospital which is affiliated with Johns Hopkins Medicine International. Most of the doctors and surgeons at Hospital Punta Pacifica were trained in the USA or in Europe.

Availability:

Retinal Detachment is treated at Hospital Punta Pacifica

4 listed ophthalmologists:

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Dr. Edith de Lopez

Cornea, Refractive Surgery and External Eye Disease

Dr. Karla Ng Gonzalez

Ophthalmology

Ophthalmology centers in Latin America (Page 1 of 2)

About Retinal Detachment Surgery

This information is intended for general information only and should not be considered as medical advice on the part of Health-Tourism.com. Any decision on medical treatments, after-care or recovery should be done solely upon proper consultation and advice of a qualified physician.

What is Retinal Detachment Surgery?
Retinal detachment surgery is carried out to treat a retinal detachment and return it to its normal position.
Surgery is currently the only option for treating retinal detachment.

What are the types of Retinal Detachment Surgery?
The most common Retinal Detachment Surgery procedures are:

  • Pneumatic retinopexy: A laser or cryotherapy procedure seals the retinal hole or tear and a gas bubble is injected into the cavity in the eye to push the retina towards the eye’s outer wall.
  • Scleral buckling: Holes or tears in the retina are sealed with an electric current or frozen with a cryoprobe or laser. A scleral buckle made of synthetic material is then placed on the outer wall of the eye which compresses the eye and pushes the retinal tear towards the outer wall. Often a gas or air bubble is inserted into the cavity to prevent the hole from moving until scarring takes place and holds it in position.
  • Vitrectomy: The surgeon makes small cuts in the eye and removes the fluid in the eye, replacing it with gas to move the retina to a new position. Sometimes the surgeon also inserts a scleral buckle alongside the vitrectomy.

What are the chances of success?
85% of patients will be successfully treated with one operation, while the remaining 15% will requiring 2 or more operations.
How well you see after surgery depends in part on whether the central part of the retina (macula) was affected by the detachment before surgery, and if it was, for how long.

Duration of procedure/surgery : 1-3 hours, depending on the type of surgery performed.

Days admitted : Usually done on an outpatient basis.
Vitrectomy may require an overnight stay.

Anesthesia : Local or general anesthesia

Recovery : - Limit physical activity for up to a week following retinal detachment surgery.
- If the gas bubble procedure is carried out you will need to keep your head facing down or to one side for up to four weeks in order to make sure the gas bubble fixes the retina in place successfully.
- Blurred vision following a retinal detachment surgery often persists for a few months.

Risks : - Discomfort, redness and swelling.
- Double vision.
- Glaucoma.
- Cataracts.
- Drooping eyelid (ptosis).

After care : - Use medicated eye drops and antibiotics after retinal detachment surgery.
- You will not be able to fly or travel to high altitudes for a few weeks following the gas bubble procedure.
- You may need a new glasses prescription if retinal detachment surgery has changed the shape of your eye.

Learn more about Retinal Detachment

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