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Pediatric Dermatology in Singapore

Hospitals, clinics and medical centers in Singapore performing Pediatric Dermatology (skin treatment of children).

Raffles Hospital

A full service private hospital offering a comprehensive range of specialist services by a team of 200 physicians. 35-40% of the patients are foreigners, and there is a dedicated department for handling medical tourists.


Pediatric Dermatology is available at Raffles Hospital

6 listed pediatricians:

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Dr. Chu Hui Ping

Paediatric gastroenterology

Dr. Veronica Toh

Neonatal intensive care

Gleneagles Hospital

A 380 bed private hospital offering tertiary acute care services that cover a wide range of medical and surgical specialties.


Pediatric Dermatology is available at Gleneagles Hospital

23 listed pediatricians:

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Dr. Wong Keng Yean

Pediatric Cardiology

Dr. Ho Ching Lin

Glaucoma and General Ophthalmology

Mount Elizabeth Hospital

One of the largest private medical centers in Asia, with the highest number of private specialists including cardiac surgeons, cardiologists and neurologists, neurosurgeons and general surgeons.


Pediatric Dermatology is available at Mount Elizabeth Hospital

20 listed pediatricians:

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Dr. Wong Keng Yean

Pediatric Cardiology

Dr. Liew Woei Kang

Paediatric Rheumatology & Immunology

National University Hospital

A 928 bed teaching hospital offering a full range of medical, surgical and diagnostic services. NUH serves as a refferal center for cancer patients, pediatrics, cardiology and other specialties.


Pediatric Dermatology is available at National University Hospital

54 listed pediatricians:

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Prof. Low Poh Sim

Programme Director, Head and Senior Consultant, Division of Paediatric Neurology (Brain and Nerve Disorders)

Dr. Dario Campana

Director, Laboratory of Immunopathology and Cell Therapy, Division of Haematology/Oncology & Bone Marrow and Cord Blood Transplantation

KK Women's And Children's Hospital

An integrated medical facility and tertiary referral center for healthcare concerns of women, children and babies.


Pediatric Dermatology is available at KK Women's And Children's Hospital

110 listed pediatricians:

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Assoc. Prof. Ho Lai Yun

Director of Department of Child Development (KKH)

Dr. Law Hai Yang

Chief Scientific Officer, Department of Pediatrics Genetics Service

Thomson Medical Center (TMC)

A women and children centred medical facility with a full range of services covering the specialties of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Pediatrics.


Pediatric Dermatology is available at Thomson Medical Center

Pediatrics centers in Singapore (Page 1 of 1)

About Pediatric Dermatology

This information is intended for general information only and should not be considered as medical advice on the part of Any decision on medical treatments, after-care or recovery should be done solely upon proper consultation and advice of a qualified physician.

What is pediatric dermatology?

This is a subspecialty of medicine that deals with skin condition affecting children.

Who is a pediatric dermatologist?

This is a medical doctor who has specialized in diagnosing, treating and managing skin diseases and conditions in infants, children, and adolescents. They understand that children’s skin is unlike adult skin and use their expertise to provide the best care for your child.

Common conditions
  • Molluscum contagiosum: This is a benign viral infection of the skin caused by a human-specific poxvirus. Infection is through contact with an affected person or after autoinoculation. The condition presents as multiple dome-shaped papules with a central depression which appear on the trunk areas. Molluscum contagiosum is common to children who are immunosuppressed or who bathe or swim together. Because the condition is usually benign and usually resolves by itself, treatment is usually not necessary
  • Viral warts: These are benign skin proliferations caused by a virus known as the human papillomavirus. Viral warts increase and peak in adolescence but thereafter decline. Viral warts usually appear on the hands and feet. Viral warts spontaneously resolve in healthy children. Resolution sometimes occurs after the appearance of blackened capillary loops.
  • Most warts spontaneously resolve within two years. However, some may persist and become enlarged and painful. Treatments such as topical salicylic acid, cryotherapy, intralesional bleomycin, topical immunotherapy, pulsed dye laser and photodynamic therapy are available but should only be used for resistant and painful cases.

Types of warts
  • Common warts: They begin as smooth flesh-colored papules which become bigger and develop a surface of thickened keratin. They can occur at injury sites.
  • Plantar warts (verrucae): They occur on the soles of feet and slightly protrude. They can be painful and they are often surrounded by a collar of keratin.
  • Mosaic warts: They occur as a collection of small, densely packed individual warts and are often resistant to treatment.
  • Plane warts: They are flat topped papules which are scattered over the arms, legs and face.


This condition occurs as golden crusted lesions which are highly contagious. It rapidly spreads through direct contact. Impetigo occurs as a primary infection or due to another condition such as scabies or atopic dermatitis. It is common in children living in tropical climates or those with atopic dermatitis. Poor hygiene and overcrowding also increase the chances of infection. Topical antiseptics and topical and systemic antibiotics may be prescribed by your doctor. Oral antibiotics may be used in severe cases.

Tinea capitis (scalp ringworm)

This is a highly contagious scalp infection caused by a fungus. It occurs predominantly in children and is common in the poorest countries. Microsporum Canis is the commonest cause of tinea capitis. Practices such as sharing items used on the scalp increase its spread.

Variations of tinea capitis
  • Grey type: characterized by circular patches with marked scaling.
  • Moth-eaten: characterized by patchy alopecia that is generally scaly.
  • Kerion: characterized by boggy tumor with pustules
  • Black dot: patchy alopecia with broken hair stubs
  • Diffuse scale: characterized by dandruff-like appearance with widespread scaling
  • Pustular type: characterized by alopecia with scattered pustules.

Learn more about Pediatric Dermatology

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