Retinal Detachment Surgery in Israel

Hospitals, clinics and medical centers in Israel performing Retinal Detachment Surgery.
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Hadassah University Medical Center Contact Hadassah University Medical Center
University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel
Hadassah medical institution includes two university hospitals in Jerusalem – on Mt. Scopus and in Ein Kerem. Both provide advanced tetriary healthcare services in all medical specialties.
Availability:
Retinal Detachment is treated at Hadassah Hospital
10 listed ophthalmologists:view all >
Prof. Jacob Pe'er
Prof. Jacob Pe'er
General Ophthalmology
Prof. Abraham Salomon
Prof. Abraham Salomon
Ophthalmology
Rambam Medical Center Contact Rambam Medical Center
Public Hospital, Haifa, Israel
A large teaching hospital staffed by over 4,000 physicians, nurses, researchers, and allied caregivers, Rambam is Northern Israel’s largest hospital, a tertiary referral center for a population of over 2 million people.
Availability:
Retinal Detachment is treated at Rambam Medical Center
13 listed ophthalmologists:view all >
Prof. Benjamin Miller, MD
Prof. Benjamin Miller, MD
Director, Department of Ophthalmology
no photo
Prof. Meyer Chava
Senior Vice Chairperson of the Ophthalmology Department
Rabin Medical Center Contact Rabin Medical Center
Public Hospital, Petah Tikva, Israel
JCI AccreditationJCI Accreditation
The second largest hospital in Israel, Rabin Medical Center is a tertiary care hospital that can handle the most complicated cases in all medical fields.
Availability:
Retinal Detachment is treated at Rabin Medical Center
6 listed ophthalmologists:view all >
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Prof. D.Weinberger
Ophtalmology
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Dr. N.Loya
Cornea
Herzliya Medical Center Contact Herzliya Medical Center
Private Hospital, Herzliya, Israel
A private hospital located on the shorelines of Herzliya, just off Tel Aviv, offering healthcare services to both local and foreign patients. The hospital is affiliated with over 500 Israeli physicians, many of whom hold high level positions at public hospitals.
Availability:
Retinal Detachment is treated at Herzliya Medical Center
12 listed ophthalmologists:view all >
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Dr. Ben - Haim
Ophthalmology
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Dr. Chen Verde
Cornea, Cataract
Assuta Hospital Contact Assuta Hospital
Private Hospital, Tel Aviv, Israel
JCI AccreditationJCI Accreditation
The new Assuta Hospital was opened in 2009, and claims to be the most modern hospital in the middle east.
Availability:
Retinal Detachment is treated at Assuta Hospital
10 listed ophthalmologists:view all >
Dr. Boklmn Amir
Dr. Boklmn Amir
Ophthalmology
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Dr. Rosen Nahum
Ophthalmology
Sheba Medical Center Contact Sheba Medical Center
Public Hospital, Tel Hashomer, Israel
The largest medical centre in Israel and the Middle East, internationally renowned for it's medical excellence. Around 31,000 inpatients are treated annually.
Availability:
Retinal Detachment is treated at Sheba Medical Center
5 listed ophthalmologists:view all >
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Dr. Dastnic Zvi
Eye Surgery
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Dr. Melamed Shlomo
Eye Surgery
Ophthalmology centers in Israel (Page 1 of 1)

About Retinal Detachment Surgery

This information is intended for general information only and should not be considered as medical advice on the part of Health-Tourism.com. Any decision on medical treatments, after-care or recovery should be done solely upon proper consultation and advice of a qualified physician.
What is Retinal Detachment Surgery?
Retinal detachment surgery is carried out to treat a retinal detachment and return it to its normal position.
Surgery is currently the only option for treating retinal detachment.

What are the types of Retinal Detachment Surgery?
The most common Retinal Detachment Surgery procedures are:
  • Pneumatic retinopexy: A laser or cryotherapy procedure seals the retinal hole or tear and a gas bubble is injected into the cavity in the eye to push the retina towards the eye’s outer wall.
  • Scleral buckling: Holes or tears in the retina are sealed with an electric current or frozen with a cryoprobe or laser. A scleral buckle made of synthetic material is then placed on the outer wall of the eye which compresses the eye and pushes the retinal tear towards the outer wall. Often a gas or air bubble is inserted into the cavity to prevent the hole from moving until scarring takes place and holds it in position.
  • Vitrectomy: The surgeon makes small cuts in the eye and removes the fluid in the eye, replacing it with gas to move the retina to a new position. Sometimes the surgeon also inserts a scleral buckle alongside the vitrectomy.

What are the chances of success?
85% of patients will be successfully treated with one operation, while the remaining 15% will requiring 2 or more operations.
How well you see after surgery depends in part on whether the central part of the retina (macula) was affected by the detachment before surgery, and if it was, for how long.

Duration of procedure/surgery:
1-3 hours, depending on the type of surgery performed.

Days admitted:
Usually done on an outpatient basis.
Vitrectomy may require an overnight stay.

Anesthesia:
Local or general anesthesia

Recovery:
- Limit physical activity for up to a week following retinal detachment surgery.
- If the gas bubble procedure is carried out you will need to keep your head facing down or to one side for up to four weeks in order to make sure the gas bubble fixes the retina in place successfully.
- Blurred vision following a retinal detachment surgery often persists for a few months.

Risks:
- Discomfort, redness and swelling.
- Double vision.
- Glaucoma.
- Cataracts.
- Drooping eyelid (ptosis).

After care:
- Use medicated eye drops and antibiotics after retinal detachment surgery.
- You will not be able to fly or travel to high altitudes for a few weeks following the gas bubble procedure.
- You may need a new glasses prescription if retinal detachment surgery has changed the shape of your eye.

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